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Putin-Lenin

COMMENTARY: Russia Manifesto Outlining Plans Is Coming True

Anthony Sutton clearly documents the link between the Jewish International Bankers and the Bolshevik Revolutionaries in his book titled “Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution” published in 1974. He also documents in his three-volume book titled: “Western Technology and Soviet Economic Development, 1917 to 1930” how western capitalistic nations financed most of the economic growth of the Soviet Union. So this ‘western’ Communist infiltration should come as no surprise to us, instead, the level of ignorance that Americans have of their own history, as well as their passiveness towards these facts, is what is hard to believe.

Putin-Lenin

“Russia manifesto outlining plans is coming true,” Source: news.com.au

EVER wondered what Vladimir Putin is up to infiltrating the US elections? Surprisingly, there is an answer to that.
In 1997, a Russian political scientist named Aleksandr Dugin and a serving Russian General named Nikolai Klokotov sat down and wrote a text that would become the foundation of Russian geopolitical strategy over the next 20 years. It was called “Foundations of Geopolitics” and it was all about how Russia could reassert itself in the world.
Chillingly, the book now reads like a to-do list for Putin’s behavior on the world stage.

Perhaps surprisingly, the document is not a secret. It has long been known to observers of Russian foreign policy and has served as a textbook among a generation of military strategists. But with the scandal over Russian influence in the US elections, growing by the day, it’s surprising how little coverage this important text has been given.

The book starts out by saying that the shrewd thing for Russia to do is to steer clear of direct military confrontation. Instead, the book counsels Russian leaders to favor political stealth. It emphasizes the need for the infiltration of Western institutions, and the use of soft power to shape the world in Russia’s favor. Sound familiar yet? We haven’t even got to the good stuff.

The text then goes into a very specific list of to-dos, about Russia’s posture towards almost every nation on earth.

Let’s start close to Russia. The book argues that Ukraine should – surprise, surprise – be annexed by Russia. “Ukraine as a state has no geopolitical meaning, no particular cultural import or universal significance, no geographic uniqueness, no ethnic exclusiveness, its certain territorial ambitions represents an enormous danger for all of Eurasia and, without resolving the Ukrainian problem, it is in general senseless to speak about continental politics.” It goes on to argue that the only use for an independent Ukraine would be to provide a barrier to Europe, but that it’s not necessary.

Next, it turns to Britain. The book’s authors say Russia should encourage Britain to leave the European Union, and thus weaken it. That’s right. Russian strategists were openly arguing in favor of Brexit in 1997 when it was still just a glimmer in Nigel Farage’s eyes.

Score so far, Putin: 2, Rest of World: 0.

How about the rest of the world? It identifies Iran as a key ally for Russia and recommends that Turkey should receive a series of “geopolitics shocks” using Kurds and Armenians to keep it off-balance. I’d give that Putin: 4, Rest of World: 0.

The document even mentions Australia, if only in its relation to China. It says that China should be encouraged to have its geopolitical posture aligned to its south – Indo-China (except Vietnam), the Philippines, Indonesia, Australia – so that Russia can remain predominant on the “Eurasian” mainland. It also talks about making Germany and France the predominant powers in the European Union, in order to unbalance that alliance, and encourage an anti-Atlantic sentiment on the continent. Score so far is Putin: 6, Rest of World: 0.

But perhaps most amazing part of the book is when it calls for Russia to “introduce geopolitical disorder into internal American activity, encouraging all kinds of separatism and ethnic, social and racial conflicts, actively supporting all dissident movements – extremist, racist, and sectarian groups, thus destabilising internal political processes in the U.S. It would also make sense simultaneously to support isolationist tendencies in American politics.” If that reads like an accurate description of Trump’s inner-circle, again remember that this text was written twenty years ago.

Like Putin, Dugin and Klokotov saw the collapse of the Soviet state as humiliating. They believed that the West had hacked infiltrated their institutions in the late-1980s, and weakened the Soviet state from within. They, therefore, sought revenge in kind – influencing the institutions of other countries, to return Russia to what they considered its rightful place as a superpower.

It’s now clear to everyone but Sean Spicer that Trump’s campaign was in communication with the Kremlin for a year leading up to his election victory. The revelation on Thursday about Jeff Sessions means that this is the story that will dominate Trump’s first term. Putin: 7, Rest of World: 0.

Of course, every nation has influential strategic thinkers who help leaders shape their thinking, but the Foundations of Geopolitics has had an outsized influence since it’s publication 20 years ago. By some accounts, the book has been used to teach a generation of military officers in Russia, while Dugin himself continues to be considered a member of Putin’s inner circle.

There are many factors that go into geopolitics — and it can be easy to overstate Putin’s influence on what are tendencies that may have arisen anyway. But reading through the document, it is hard to escape the conclusion that much of Russia’s foreign policy has been shaped by Dugin and Klokotov’s thinking – and that that is in turn, shaping the way the world is heading.

And that should be a concern to us all. Their thinking breaks with many of the central tenets that underpin our politics. It rejects democracy and places nationalism at the heart of how geopolitics should operate. It is essentially a wholesale rejection of the globalization that Western economies have engaged in during the past four decades.

The question for the US intelligence community, and the Congress leaders who are looking into Russian influence in the US election, now becomes, what will Putin do next? Was his mission in assisting Trump’s election simply to pay back the USA for the collapse of the Soviet Union? Or is it to simply weaken the US, so that his own Eurasian Union — a hierarchical, anti-democratic alliance of countries with Russia at its head — can become a superpower? Who knows, but in the same way that the USA felt they had a friend in the Kremlin when President Gorbachev was in power, Putin clearly has a friend in the White House. If I were Putin, I’d be playing that card for as long as it lasts.

 

Trump-Dugin

COMMENTARY: How Trump’s Foreign Policy Is Making Russian Fascism Great Again

They infiltrated absolutely everything creating “the filth” they are now pretending to fight against. Dugin’s ‘fight’ is nothing more than the manipulation and control of the opposition called far-right. They have always ruled both sides of the coin. Welcome to 21st century Comintern! 

Screenshot from Alexander Dugin's YouTube channel
YouTube

“How Trump’s foreign policy is making Russian fascism great again,” Source: Hareetz.com

As he sabotages America’s strategic alliances in favor of pro-Kremlin autocrats, the president is acting out the geopolitical fantasies of Alexander Dugin, rising Russian fascist ideologue and guru to Trump’s alt-right base.

“There are not many instances in history which show great and powerful states creating alliances and organizations to limit their own strength.”

That’s what the famous theorist of U.S. geopolitics, Nicholas J. Spykman, once wrote. Today’s Republican Party may be an exception to the rule.

The Trumpist wing of the GOP and its alt-right fan base is dedicated to curbing the power of liberals on the world stage, sabotaging U.S. influence abroad in favor of international, radical right-wing alliances, with partners who are explicitly enamored of the Kremlin.

It’s hardly surprising, then, that Alexander Dugin, a leading Russian fascist ideologue, and nexus for far-right activists all over Europe and the U.S., welcomes Trump as the harbinger of a new world order. It’s more surprising, and worrying, that the Trump foreign policy pivot is beginning to resemble some of Dugin’s unsavory theories.

Because the U.S. has traditionally worked diplomatically to re-enforce ties with elected governments in Europe, this subversive effort by the GOP appears to stake the U.S.’s global position on the continued rise of the radical right.

A key example can be found in Germany, where Trump’s loose-cannon approach has rendered the U.S. an untrustworthy ally in the public eye, making Putin look reliable by comparison.

When the U.S. ambassador to Germany effectively told Breitbart that he favored the resurgent “anti-establishment” populists – a hat-tip to the far-right party, Alternative for Germany – over the elected government, the news only further confirmed that the Trump Administration is more interested in undermining the U.S.’s own allies and liberal democracy, than it is in building credibility and solidarity.

The question then arises: Are America’s post-war allies still the allies of the Trumpist GOP, and vice versa?

The GOP’s new diplomacy bases international alliances on ideological allegiances over diplomatic commitments and strategic interests. When nationalism is raised to the level of state ideology, like attracts like, and different authoritarian nationalist parties buoy each other up to achieve a particular balance of power.

A hint at the return of this form of sovereignty can be drawn from the names and places of far-right organizing. There is Paul Manafort’s “Hapsburg Group” and the 2014 Vienna Conference of oligarchs, aristocrats, and far-right politicians on the anniversary of Metternich’s 1814 Congress of Vienna. And then there is the bizarre and repeated identification of French President Emmanuel Macron with Napoleon, a much-loathed figure in the historiography of the Central and Eastern European far-right.

The League party's activists hold flares as they arrive to attend a rally by party's leader Matteo Salvini, in Milan, Italy, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018.
Antonio Calanni/AP

The set of “anti-establishment” far-right forces currently riding populism into power cares little for “the people” and much for the trappings of Empire.

What is most striking about these moves by the Trump wing of the Republican Party is its obvious shift in geopolitical doctrine. On the most fundamental levels, the U.S. is now subdivided utterly into two competing groups with two entirely different geopolitical aims.

In one camp, the Trumpist GOP exhibits strong isolationist tendencies, positing an “America First!” exuberant nationalism. In the other, the Democratic Party seeks and has sought, with mixed results, to contain the rise of Russian influence in Europe and Eurasia.

These two different strategic interests diverge so greatly as to represent two irreconcilable worldviews with totally contradictory sets of values and ideals.

French far right leader Marine Le Pen, Austria's Freedom Party Secretary General Harald Vilimsky (L) and Front National Vice-President, Louis Aliot at a May Day gathering in Nice, France. May 1, 2018
Thibault Camus/AP

Though isolationist, the Republican Party is also expansionist, at least ideologically, as it seeks to weaken its liberal opponents worldwide and to cultivate stronger ties with opposition populist far-right parties that are openly affiliated with the Russian Federation. Needless to say, this is a pivot for which the Kremlin devoutly wishes and a network it both openly and quietly facilitates and funds.

The explicitly geopolitical ideology underlying this right-wing alliance, which engages particularly the Austrian Freedom Party and the League in Italy, as well as Iran and Syria, is what’s known as “neo-Eurasianism.” 

This so-called “philosophy,” promoted by the likes of occult fascist Aleksandr Dugin, aims at developing a “traditionalist” federation of ethnostates throughout Eurasia, with Moscow as a kind of de facto imperial center.

It’s no coincidence Dugin openly celebrated Trump’s win in the U.S. elections: according to a YouTube video he produced in the president’s honor, his victory stopped the expansion of globalism “at its very center.” It inaugurated a newly multipolar world, an idea for which Vladimir Putin has “been the vanguard,” in which America will be a “powerful and important [pole] but not the only one, and more importantly, one that has no claims to being exceptional.”

Alexander Dugin on Donald Trump’s victoryYouTube

Dugin’s principle work, Foundations of Geopolitics, is not available in English translation, but those able to read the Russian text will find, masquerading behind bromides of anti-racism, a fully-fledged Aryan mythos, complete with esoteric legends of Hyperboria (the legendary Arctic site of the origins of humanity and its giant “Hyperborian” root-race), as well as the essential superiority of “the people of the North.” The Iranian connection is built on a supposed mythic connection between Persian and Russian ethnicities via a shared spiritual Aryan ancestry.

The neo-Eurasian worldview claims to support a multipolar federation of authoritarian traditionalists is deeply racially charged. It appeals to the racist nationalists, hardline Russian Orthodox clerics, reactionary Catholics, and far-right evangelicals that constitute the core of the global far right wing

It’s no surprise that Dugin has become an object of pilgrimage for members of both the alt-right and far left, having recently entertained far right YouTube ‘celebrities’ Lauren Southern and Brittany Pettibone, with whom he spoke on a panel in Moscow.

He the go-to guru for a long list of alt-right figures: Alex Jones of Infowars interviews him together with Mike Cernovich; Jack Posobiec exults that Dugin is his summer readingNina Kouprianova, wife of alt-right leader Richard Spencer, says “Dugin is one of the greatest minds of our time.” Not to be left out, Dugin has repaid Richard Spencer’s own high regard by tweeting approvingly an article by Spencer which functions as an alt-right catechism.

Former KKK head David Duke is a long-time fanasking rhetorically a year ago: “Dugin terrifies degenerate filth – I wonder why that is?” 

The Democratic Party seeks to contain the Kremlin’s expansionist “Greater Russia” that, having taken over Crimea, increasingly envisions Ukraine as part of its “heartland.” Needless to say, Trump’s recent pronouncement backed the Kremlin, and countered those challenging Russia’s new imperialism: “The people of Crimea, from what I’ve heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were.” 

Part of Russia’s strategy relies on a theory of what the 20th century “father of geopolitics” Halford Mackinder called the “world island,” an imagined collective territory ranging from the Cape to Kamchatka to Lisbon, to which the Eurasian “heartland” provides the key. “Whoever rules the Heartland will rule the World Island,” Mackinder declared, urging the Atlantic powers to prevent a dangerous alliance between Germany and Russia. 

One of the many geographers compelled by Mackinder’s arguments was Karl Haushofer, a German nationalist who seized the notion of a Eurasian force, added the notion of lebensraum, and provided the key influence for Hitler’s deputy Rudolf Hess, from which came the Nazi Drang nach Osten (Drive to the East) and the Holocaust.

Dugin’s neo-Eurasianism recalls the precursors and originators of Nazi geopolitical theory. But in his hands, it has become an anti-modern, imperial federation of Kremlin-backed ethno-states.

For Dugin and other fascists inspired by “National Bolshevism,” Hitler would have succeeded in building the Third Reich if only he had been able to build a national-socialist bloc with the Soviets, instead of invading.

The question confronting geopolitics today, then, is not only that of alliances between Germany and Russia but of the alliance between German and Russian nationalists against the North Atlantic powers. That is a meeting of minds that the Trump administration’s pivot toward Europe’s populists, including the Alternative for Germany, is clearly facilitating.

It is important to emphasize that the necessary outcome of alliances between countries is never wholly predetermined by their relationship to the local ecology and landscape. But geopolitics matter. When nationalist forces build a geopolitical alliance – similar to an axis of far-right powers -pitted against the liberal ideas bequeathed by the American and French revolutions, we know where that leads.

What appears today to conservatives as the brio of a nationalist wave manifests itself tomorrow in targeted violence, pogroms, and expansionism. When nationalist states expand into one another’s territory, massive and avoidable wars erupt. Those who suffer are the workers and their families – “the people” whom populists claim to represent.

If the Trumpist Republican strategy was to subvert the liberal world order, that would be one thing. But that subversion masks a determination to fuel a wider reactionary surge, one that threatens to undermine basic principles of self-determination, freedom, and equality.

So we should take their tactics of illiberal subversion seriously. But we should be more worried that this kind of populism is masking the formation of a deeply authoritarian empire-building that already led to the twentieth century’s world wars.

Russia

COMMENTARY: What’s Behind Russian Support For World’s Separatist Movements?

The level of Putin’s hypocrisy is UNREAL, he would side with anyone who helps further the tribe’s objective. All these separatist groups are led by Communists! It is not only Putin it is American politicians as well who are playing this DISGUSTING GAME they are all in bed together working for the same goal. The EU was solely created to destroy the sovereignty of European countries. Now that this has been achieved, it is time to unite the EU with mother Russia and create the Eurasian bloc ruled by the new Soviet Union. The entire Middle East will be ruled by the Jews from Russia and the US along with the rest will be converted into Communist satellites. The ONLY solution would be to really drain the swamp with Trump being the first one to leave because he is protecting and encouraging the ENEMY. The corruption of the US government is destroying the free world. 

Russia

“What’s Behind Russian Support for World’s Separatist Movements?,” Source: nbcnews.com

MOSCOW — Britain’s decision to leave the European Union is just the beginning if some in the Kremlin have their way.

Northern Irish, Scottish, Basque, Catalan and Italian secessionists have been invited to Moscow for a conference, partly funded by Russia, planned for August. They will mingle with Texan, Californian, Puerto-Rican and Hawaiian wannabe-separatists from all over the world, the conference organizer says.

“Our goal is to consolidate efforts based on international legal standards [and] to achieve the very democracy the European Union and the United States talk about, but [the democracy] in its true meaning,” Alexander Ionov, head of the Anti-Globalist Movement of Russia, which is organizing the event, told NBC News.

One of the international standards he referred to is to a nation’s right for self-determination that is part of the United Nations’ chapter.

Ionov said that the Russian government’s modest grant of $53,000 to accommodate dozens of guests will be supplemented by private donations from “Texas and other countries” that openly or clandestinely support the secessionist cause.

Western leaders and Russia experts say the Kremlin backs fringe, ultra-nationalist and separatist parties to destabilize groupings such as NATO and the EU and to thwart U.S. missile defense installations that Moscow sees as a threat to its security.

They also say Moscow uses these movements to promote its political agenda, gain more political leverage within the EU and push for the lifting of Western sanctions imposed on Moscow after its 2014 annexation of Crimea.

President Barack Obama said in April that Russia’s Vladimir Putin “exploits” the EU migrant crisis because he is “not entirely persuaded” by European unity. In January, Congress instructed James Clapper, the U.S.’s director of national intelligence, to investigate how the Kremlin finances these parties.

Image: Meeting of Open Tribune council of experts discusses civil society in modern Russia
The director of the Institute of Political Studies, political scientist Sergei Markov at a meeting of the Open Tribune council of experts to discuss the issue of civil society in modern Russia. Anna Isakova / TASS via Getty Images

A Russian opposition leader claims the Kremlin’s new friendships reflect its political desperation to find political allies of any stripe.

“This is a diagnosis of international isolation,” said Gennady Gudkov, a former lawmaker who was evicted from the State Duma, Russia’s lower house of parliament, after longtime criticism of Putin’s policies. “Now we embrace the very people we had never wanted to share bread with.”

Putin has a different take.

“Nobody wants to feed and subsidize weaker economies, maintain other states, entire nations,” he said after the U.K.’s shock vote to leave the EU, known as Brexit. One of the arguments deployed by those who campaigned for Britain to leave was that wealthier countries contribute disproportionately more than their poorer counterparts.

A pro-Kremlin political analyst and former lawmaker called Russia’s new alliances with separatists “very useful” — but blamed the West for forcing Moscow to embrace their cause.

Image: President Vladimir Putin
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin. MAXIM SHEMETOV / Reuters

“The EU [and] the U.S. push Russia to support all sorts of anti-establishment movements,” Sergei Markov told NBC News, referring to Euroskeptic and separatist groups.”

He echoed the Kremlin’s assertion that the West plots to weaken resurgent Russia by installing pro-Western governments in neighboring ex-Soviet republics such as Georgia and Ukraine, and by giving financial support to opposition movements, human rights groups and NGOs.

Ionov, of the Anti-Globalist Movement, and Markov said the Kremlin does not finance foreign secessionist parties. Top Kremlin officials also denied the accusation, according to Russian media reports.

However, France’s far-right Euroskeptic National Front Party has admitted receiving $12.2 million loan from a Kremlin-affiliated bank in 2014, according to Bloomberg. And it asked for another loan of $27.7 million in February, the report added.

“I will look for funds where I know I might get them,” the party’s treasurer Wallerand Saint-Just told Bloomberg. “I found some financing there in 2014, so yes I am going to try again.”

The National Front did not respond to NBC News’ requests for comment.

Moscow’s conservative pivot

Vladimir Putin’s return to the Kremlin for a third presidency in 2012 was marked by a conservative pivot for Moscow. The Kremlin now extols Christian values, denounces Western influences and bans sex education in schools. This “traditional” worldview overlaps with efforts to restore Russia’s clout in former Soviet regions — such as Ukraine and Georgia —and forge ties with nationalist and fringe groups in Europe.

Image: Delegates listen to speeches during the 'International Russian Conservative Forum' in St. Petersburg
Delegates listen to speeches during the ‘International Russian Conservative Forum’ in St. Petersburg, Russia, 22 march 2015. ANATOLY MALTSEV / EPA

Boris Reitschuster, a veteran German journalist who authored several books on Russia, claims that the ties date back to the first years of Putin’s presidency — and his past as a KGB spy in East Germany in 1985-1990, where he developed ties to the Stasi, the secret police.

“I think it started shortly after Putin came to power,” Reitschuster told the Voice of America in April. “He was a KGB man, and everything he is using now is the old methods of the KGB and the Stasi.”

One of these parties is the neo-Nazi National Democratic Party of Germany, whose former leader Udo Voigt, a current member of the European Parliament, attended the International Russian Conservative Forum conference in St. Petersburg in 2015.

Image: Russian economy will overcome crisis in two years - Putin
Russian President Vladimir Putin chooses a questioner during his annual press conference in Moscow in December, 2014. SERGEI CHIRIKOV / EPA
Brainwashing

COMMENTARY: Meet The Moscow Mouthpiece Married To A Racist Alt-Right Boss

The Daily Beast is not trustworthy media and is using this article as propaganda against the right. And when it comes to ‘racism’ the ONLY racists in the world are the Jews and their Talmudic teachings. What we see happening is a very sick game, where they have infiltrated both sides – right and left and play one against the other to get the Goyim’s to self-destruct. Jews are known for using whatever it takes to further their plan and this strategy is the one they use the most because it is obviously the most effective. We have seen it happen throughout history, they infiltrate and manipulate both sides to achieve their goal. 

Brainwashing

Meet the Moscow Mouthpiece Married to a Racist Alt-Right Boss,” Source: thedailybeast.com

Nina Kouprianova is not a member of the racist alt-right. At least, that’s what she’ll say when you ask her. “I am not a member of any movement,” Kouprianova, who was born in the Soviet Union, recently told The Daily Beast via email. She added that she was “sympathetic” toward movements that “challenge the dominant and globally oriented post-Liberal ideology,” but white nationalism—that fracturing of the U.S., resulting in a white ethno-state that would salve the wounds of American racists—is not for her.

Still, the track record, both personally and professionally, of Kouprianova—who also goes by the nom de plume Nina Byzantina—casts a pall over her denials. This is, after all, a woman who elected to marry Richard Spencer, the longtime lodestar of American white nationalism and progenitor of the term “alt-right.” While the two are currently separated—as Spencer told The Washington Post, his recent work has taken a “toll” on their relationship—Kouprianova hasn’t publicly distanced herself from the views of her husband, a man who has kept neo-Nazis enthralled with his views and who has expressed continued admiration for Vladimir Putin.

In fact, Kouprianova, who has a young daughter with Spencer, wrote a letter this week to the Flathead Beacon, one of their local papers in Montana. In it, Kouprianova compares the “witch hunts” surrounding her husband to Stalinist purges: “Threats and intimidation, which my current extended family continues to experience in Whitefish [Montana], remind me of the way my grandfather was forced to live [in the Soviet Union],” Kouprianova wrote. And to be fair, following Spencer’s rise to prominence, threats—veiled and otherwise—have risen alongside. But the notion that the environment circling Kouprianova and Spencer is in any form reminiscent of Stalinist repression is, of course, laughable. And while the Kremlin’s transparent support for Donald Trump and the white nationalists undergirding his campaign are both concerning trends on their own, it’s the links between the two—links that are only just now becoming apparent—that are cause for that much more concern. It’s those links that actors like Kouprianova have helped expand.

Yet Kouprianova’s connections with the alt-right don’t end with her marriage to the movement’s most prominent face. If anything, Kouprianova may play an outsize role in the internationalization of Spencer’s movement—especially as it pertains to Russia, which Spencer views, bizarrely, as the “sole white power in the world.” In addition to her prominent Twitter persona—offering the types of ironic barbs in defense of Kremlin machinations familiar to anyone who’s recently dealt with high-level officials from Moscow—Kouprianova has devoted her efforts to translating the works of Russian political philosopher Alexander Dugin.

If Dugin’s name is at all familiar, it’s likely due to his neo-fascist screeds, posited as geopolitical analysis, that have begun swirling international trends. As Spencer is to the alt-right, so, too, is Dugin to the modern incarnation of “Eurasianism,” a geopolitical theory positing Russia as the inheritor of “Eternal Rome” and one of the primary ideological bulwarks pushing the Kremlin to carve eastern Ukraine into the fanciful entity of “Novorossiya.” While much of Dugin’s influence on the Kremlin has been over-hyped, Dugin’s Foundations of Geopolitics remains assigned to every member of Russia’s General Staff Academy. And despite Kouprianova’s claims that “there is no evidence of communication between” Dugin and Putin, Charles Clover, in his masterful history of Eurasianism, noted that Putin and Dugin met a few months after the former ascended to the presidency. “Soon,” wrote Clover, “there were sponsors, contacts, and open doors” for Dugin.

This relationship—and the perception of such proximity to the Kremlin—is one of the reasons Dugin landed on the U.S. government’s recent sanctions list. It hasn’t, however, kept Dugin from courting American white nationalists—those who’d fracture the United States in pursuit of whites-only nation. For instance, in 2015 Dugin hosted a lecture, via Skype, at the founding of the U.S.’s Traditionalist Worker Party. That party remains helmed by Matthew Heimbach, who has tabbed Putin as the “leader of the free world.”

Dugin also hosted a separate lecture, again via Skype, at Texas A&M in 2015, partnering with local neo-Nazi Preston Wiginton—the same white supremacist who, last month, invited Spencer to speak at Texas A&M. For good measure, when Wiginton traveled through Russia a few years ago, he sub-leased an apartment in Moscow from David Duke—the former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard who not only believes Russia holds the “key to white survival,” but who has cultivated his own relationship with Dugin.

Kouprianova, who says she’s never met Dugin, nonetheless defended his work, noting that “the Western establishment is currently in the throws [sic] of a major anti-Russian hysteria” and adding that Dugin is a “well-educated scholar.” As she wrote via email, “Western media cherry-picks convenient quotations from decades ago splicing them with literally edited statements on the Ukraine crisis, in which some of his friends were killed, incidentally, while characterizing him with the usual character-assassination keywords.” (In 2014, Dugin called for a “genocide” of Ukrainians.) Kouprianova—who lists Dugin’s works as the only books she’s translated—added that she began working on translating Dugin’s works “as part of a volunteer effort,” although she’s “not even sure whether” her translations were eventually used.

But Kouprianova’s affinity for Russian expansionism doesn’t end with Dugin. Not only has she routinely papered over Russia’s local human-rights atrocities—“Like, OMG, Chechnya is, likes, totes oppressed by Putin!” she recently tweeted, plastering sarcasm over Russia’s domestic depredations—but she has referred, time and again, to Russia’s invasion of eastern Ukraine as a “liberation war.” Likewise, Kouprianova has been outspoken in defense of Russia’s domestic media landscape. Outsiders may critique Putin jailing, silencing, and even killing independent journalists. But to Kouprianova, the Kremlin “has chosen the path… of healthy debate.”

And in Spencer’s white-nationalist journal, Kouprianova went to bat for Russia’s premier propaganda outlet, RT. (RT, for what it’s worth, has referred to Kouprianova as an “independent scholar.”) Although her articles were recently removed, Kouprianova noted that RT, which has “become a welcome alternative news source for many,” also “provides great coverage of a variety of subjects.”

Interestingly, Kouprianova’s presence in Spencer’s life has caused notable schisms within the white-nationalist community in the U.S. While ethnic Russians are, broadly, considered part of the broader “European identity” pushed by American white nationalists, Spencer told Mother Jones that his wife is part Georgian. For some members of Spencer’s racist community, that makes something other than white. For instance, prominent white nationalist Greg Johnson, who doesn’t view Georgia as part of Europe, wrote in 2014 that “Richard is basically being dominated by Nina Nogoodnik, his Russian-Georgian wife.”

Johnson, as it is, says Kouprianova is not a white nationalist. And yes, Kouprianova may not share outright her husband’s views on ethnic cleansing. But given Kouprianova’s work with Dugin, her writings for America’s most prominent white nationalist journal runs counter to those claims—and helps build one more bridge in the ongoing relationship between Russia and America’s white nationalists.

Israel - China

COMMENTARY: For China’s Global Ambitions, ‘Iran Is At The Center Of Everything’

For the communist tribe, Iran is key. The One Belt One Road will not only boost communist Chinese economy but will help the regime expand their tentacles to Europe and the rest of the globe. Russia will work together with China on the Silk Road initiative. Israel, on the other hand, is cozying up to Russia, and Russia backs Iran. So should we still believe that ‘tensions’ between Israel and Iran are real? Or are they simply entertainment for the masses?

We know that Israel has been using the US for decades, helping strengthen Russia and China, with American technology. The Jews steal from the American taxpayers, by infiltrating the US Government with Jews and using bribes and blackmail to control their puppets at high government levels.

Anthony Sutton’s three volume book titled “Western Technology and Soviet Economic Development, 1917 to 1930”, published by The Hoover Institute at Stanford University, documents how western nations were the ones to finance the economic growth of the Soviet Union during that period. The money came mostly from The United States and Germany. 730 Americans worked at the Stalingrad Tractor Plant. The Soviet Union’s manufacturing and technological base helped supply North Vietnam’s armaments to kill American soldiers. The base was not only built by US firms but paid in great part by American taxpayers. 

We see how the entire Middle East is falling into the hands of the communist Jews. What will happen to the Arabs? Most of the Goyim are already being killed and those left will become slaves once their masters finally take over Arab lands. Welcome to the New Soviet Union also called New World Order! 

China

An Iranian employee at the Pardis Kaghaz Pazh recycled paper factory in Neyshabur, Iran, one of eight factories established by Zuoru Lin, a Chinese entrepreneur from Beijing. Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times

NEYSHABUR, Iran —

“For China’s Global Ambitions, ‘Iran Is at the Center of Everything’,” Source: nytimes.com

When Zuoru Lin, a Beijing entrepreneur, first heard about business opportunities in eastern Iran, he was skeptical. But then he bought a map and began to envision the region without any borders, as one enormous market.

“Many countries are close by, even Europe,” Mr. Lin, 49, said while driving his white BMW over the highway connecting Tehran to the eastern Iranian city of Mashhad recently.

“Iran is at the center of everything.”

For millenniums, Iran has prospered as a trading hub linking East and West. Now, that role is set to expand in coming years as China unspools its “One Belt, One Road” project, which promises more than $1 trillion in infrastructure investment — bridges, rails, ports, and energy — in over 60 countries across Europe, Asia and Africa. Iran, historically a crossroads, is strategically at the center of those plans.

Like pieces of a sprawling geopolitical puzzle, components of China’s infrastructure network are being put in place. In eastern Iran, Chinese workers are busily modernizing one of the country’s major rail routes, standardizing gauge sizes, improving the track bed and rebuilding bridges, with the ultimate goal of connecting Tehran to Turkmenistan and Afghanistan.

Much the same is happening in western Iran, where railroad crews are working to link the capital to Turkey and, eventually, to Europe. Other rail projects will connect Tehran and Mashhad with deepwater ports in the country’s south.

Once dependent on Beijing during the years of international isolation imposed by the West for its nuclear program, Iran is now critical to China’s ability to realize its grandiose ambitions. Other routes to Western markets are longer and lead through Russia, potentially a competitor of China.

“It is not as if their project is canceled if we don’t participate,” said Asghar Fakhrieh-Kashan, the Iranian deputy minister of roads and urban development. “But if they want to save time and money, they will choose the shortest route.”

He added with a smile:

“There are also political advantages to Iran, compared to Russia. They are highly interested in working with us.”

Mr. Lin visiting the Khavaran Alyaf Parsian polyester factory. He established his factories along what will be a key part of the “One Belt, One Road” trade route. Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times
Others worry that with the large-scale Chinese investment and China’s growing presence in the Iranian economy, Tehran will become more dependent than ever on China, already its biggest trading partner.
China is also an important market for Iranian oil, and because of remaining unilateral American sanctions that intimidate global banks, it is the only source of the large amounts of capital Iran needs to finance critical infrastructure projects. But that, apparently, is a risk the leadership is prepared to take.
“China is dominating Iran,” said Mehdi Taghavi, an economics professor at Allameh Tabataba’i University in Tehran, adding that the “Iranian authorities do not see any drawbacks to being dependent on China. Together, we are moving ahead.”

It is not just roads and rail lines that Iran is getting from China. Iran is also becoming an increasingly popular destination for Chinese entrepreneurs like Mr. Lin. With a few words of Persian, as well as low-interest loans and tax breaks from the Chinese and Iranian governments, he has built a small empire since moving to Iran in 2002. His eight factories make a wide variety of goods that find markets in Iran and in neighboring countries.

“You can say that I was even more visionary than some of our politicians,” Mr. Lin said with a laugh.

Since 2013, when the “One Belt, One Road” plan was started, he has had dozens of visitors from China and multiple meetings with the Chinese ambassador in Tehran.

“I was a pioneer, and they want to hear my experiences,” he said.

Mr. Lin established his factories along what will be a key part of the trade route — a 575-mile electrified rail line linking Tehran and Mashhad, financed with a $1.6 billion loan from China. When completed and attached to the wider network, the new line will enable Mr. Lin to export his goods as far as northern Europe, Poland and Russia, at much less cost than today.

“I am expecting a 50 percent increase in revenue,” Mr. Lin said. He lit another cigarette. “Of course, Iran’s economy will also grow. China will expand. Its power will grow.”

He played Chinese pop music in his car and tapped his fingers on the wheel. “Life is good in Iran,” he said. “The future is good.”

Iranian and Chinese employees working at the recycled paper factory. Arash Khamooshi for The New York Times

Iranians who spotted Mr. Lin driving between his factories waved and smiled. Having mastered a few basic phrases in Persian over the years, he said “hi” and “goodbye” to some of his 2,000 employees. Iranians are hard workers, he said, but he does not like their food. “We grow our own vegetables and eat Chinese food,” he said. “Just like home.”

Even when the boss was out of earshot, workers in his factories said that they were very happy with the Chinese.

“They pay every month on time and only hire people instead of fire them,” Amir Dalilian, a guard, said. “If more will come, our economy will flourish.”

When finished, the proposed rail link will stretch nearly 2,000 miles, from Urumqi, the capital of China’s western region of Xinjiang, to Tehran. If all goes according to plan, it will connect Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, China’s state-owned paper, China Daily, wrote. Track sizes need to be adjusted and new connections made, as well as upgrades to the newest trains.

In a 2016 test, China and Iran drove a train from the port of Shanghai in eastern China to Tehran in just 12 days, a journey that takes 30 days by sea. In Iran, they used the existing track between Tehran and Mashhad, powered by a slower diesel-powered train. When the new line is opened in 2021, it is expected to accommodate electric trains at speeds up to 125 miles an hour.

Mr. Fakhrieh-Kashan, an English speaker who oversees negotiation of most of the larger international state business deals, said the Chinese initiative would do much more than just provide a channel for transporting goods.

“Think infrastructure, city planning, cultural exchanges, commercial agreements, investments and tourism,” he said.

“You can pick any project, they are all under this umbrella.”

Business ties between Iran and China have been growing since the United States and its European allies at the time started pressuring Iran over its nuclear program around 2007. China remains the largest buyer of Iranian crude, even after Western sanctions were lifted in 2016, allowing Iran to again sell oil in European markets.

Chinese state companies are active all over the country, building highways, digging mines and making steel. Tehran’s shops are flooded with Chinese products and its streets clogged with Chinese cars.

Iran’s leaders hope that the country’s participation in the plan will enable them to piggyback on China’s large economic ambitions.

“The Chinese plan is designed in such a way that it will establish Chinese hegemony across half of the world,” Mr. Fakhrieh-Kashan said.

“While Iran will put its own interests first, we are creating corridors at the requests of the Chinese. It will give us huge access to new markets.”

Operation Talpiot

VIDEO: Australian High Court Case To Expose Israel

Will Brendon O’Connell be able to finally bring his case to the Australian High Court and grab international attention? Let’s help him do it! Will all those people he names help support him by exposing the communist Jews in court? Let’s hope they do! Pay close attention when he talks about Ken O’Keefe, Max Igan, etc., who never say a word about Operation Talpiot and how Israel has been stealing technology from the US and sending it over to Russia and China who are rebuilding the Soviet Empire. Do not trust those who claim to expose the tribe, but don’t talk about such a KEY issue. They should be boycotted. Time to separate the wheat from the chaff.  

 

https://youtu.be/ghsGnjXrvH0

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China Silk Road

COMMENTARY: Globalization 2.0 – How China’s Two-Day Summit Aims To Shape A New World Order

We don’t intend to sound pessimistic or dramatic, but the New World Order is here. It’s over for the west and for democracy, whatever that word ever meant! We allowed Communism to expand and take charge of the world. China and Russia are in control, that means Communism is in control. It has always been, but now it’s official. There will be no progress, they will suffocate us, and there will be no mercy for those who don’t follow orders. Duterte’s recent comments about Trump and the West, are simply part of the brainwashing to fool the ignorant into thinking there are still two sides in this. The ‘process is complete’ now it’s time for them to take action by creating world blocs easier to handle. 

We must thank the lazy ones who did not care to take the time to read and inform themselves and spread the word. Lenin referred to them as ‘useful idiots’. No one will be able to progress under Communism, they all wasted their time trying to make more money and save it, that was their biggest mistake, they failed to see the big picture. The money belongs to them, not to you. Thanks to the egotistic attitude and passivity of most, we will all become SLAVES OF THE NEW WORLD ORDER RULED BY COMMUNISM. 

China Silk Road

Workers last month install wires on the “Golden Bridge of Silk Road” structure outside the National ConventionCenter in Beijing. (Andy Wong / Associated Press) (Andy Wong / AP)
“Globalization 2.0: How China’s two-day summit aims to shape a new world order,” Source: latimes.com
Last month, oil started flowing from a pipeline in coastal Myanmar to southern China, bypassing the Strait of Malacca chokepoint through which most of the larger nation’s crude imports pass by ship.

Earlier this year, Africa’s first electric transnational railway began running from landlocked Ethiopia to Djibouti, where China has set up a foreign military outpost. And last year, an inaugural freight train from eastern China arrived in Iran days after the easing of international sanctions on the Islamic republic.

Such projects represent China’s most ambitious steps yet to reshape half the globe into a world order tethered more to its orbit than the United States and Europe’s.

Chinese officials aim to further that goal when 28 heads of state arrive this Sunday for a two-day forum in Beijing, where they will negotiate a vision for the so-called Belt and Road Initiative. The multi-trillion dollar proposal is President Xi Jinping’s signature foreign policy project — an infrastructure plan that spans more than 60 countries and about one-third of the global economy.

The path loosely re-creates ancient Silk Road trade routes through Central Asia and the Indian Ocean. China’s leaders call it an opportunity for global cooperation — orange banners lining Beijing highways promise “common prosperity” — but it will also spread Chinese investment and influence across Asia, Europe, and Africa.

This forum offers Xi the chance to burnish his legacy before a Communist Party leadership shuffle this fall. It also allows him to reinforce China as a geopolitical alternative amid the United States’ turn inward under President Trump and the anti-free trade sentiments coursing through Europe.

State media has nicknamed the project Globalization 2.0.

“The West and East are switching their roles,” said Ni Lexiong, professor emeritus at Shanghai University of Political Science and Law. “China is awakened.”

Here’s some more on what you need to know about the initiative and its first major forum.


Whose belt, what road?

The program has undergone several name reincarnations — from Silk Road Economic Belt to One Belt, One Road. (Officials avoided the literal English acronym for the summit, which would have read BARF. They are calling it the Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation, or BRF.)

The “belt” refers to a land route from Western China through Central Asia to Europe. The “road” links to Europe by sea, connecting the country with Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. Some analysts liken it to the Marshall Plan, the American-led infrastructure initiative that rebuilt European allies after World War II.

Xi launched the mega-project in 2013 to fuel growth, reduce excess capacity in industries such as steel, and enhance China’s role abroad. Officials label it a “win-win solution” that benefits the entire region, particularly underdeveloped nations.

Four years on, its success is uncertain. Separate bridge and rail projects label themselves part of the initiative. No central institution tracks progress.

A train filled with textiles and T-shirts now chugs 7,500 miles from the Chinese factory town of Yiwu to London, cutting the delivery time of a ship by weeks. But it’s costlier and carries smaller amounts.

Certain efforts have sparked protests in places such as Sri Lanka, where some residents in the southern port town of Hambantota say Chinese firms take jobs and threaten national sovereignty. Pakistan is sending 10,000 soldiers to guard construction of an economic corridor, worth more than $50 billion, from militant attacks. India also sees the project as a challenge to its sovereignty, as it cuts through territory claimed by the country.

“China is going to really struggle to win people’s trust,” said Tom Miller, author of ”China’s Asian Dream,” a recent book about the New Silk Road. The forum needs to “persuade people what they are doing is win-win and not a double-win for China.”

Who’s attending the forum?

Hundreds of senior officials and dignitaries will convene at a Beijing lakeside retreat, including Russian President Vladimir Putin and Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte. North Korea also will send a delegation, despite deteriorating ties with its ally China.

Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni plans to attend, the one representative from the Group of Seven nations, a disappointment for China. Matthew Pottinger, one of the Trump administration’s main Asia policymakers, is expected to lead a small group. Heads of the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations also are expected.

Bright orange and yellow signs plastered at Beijing bus stops announce the summit’s “mutual benefits.” Last week, the official New China News Agency ran more than 250 articles mentioning the initiative.

The state-run China Daily newspaper referred to the project as a “new trajectory for mankind.” It also released a series of videos this week featuring an American journalist telling his daughter a bedtime story — about the infrastructure plan.

What’s this meeting actually going to accomplish?

Analysts don’t anticipate big surprises. Most deals, they say, were scripted long in advance.

As with much in China, the symbolism counts.

Officials are expected to emphasize the globalization Xi championed in his January speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. They’ll also try to soothe participants anxious about China’s intentions and Western countries worried about transparency and oversight.

How, for example, will the project address corruption in Central Asia or environmental standards in Laos? What are the consequences to investing in highly volatile regions with questionable human rights and business records?

“The summit is meant to satisfy, especially Western requests, for greater institutionalism of the whole project,” said Jan Gaspers, head of the European China Policy Unit at Mercator Institute for China Studies in Berlin. “There’s good reason to be skeptical.”

Who’s going to pay for this new Silk Road?

Right now, mostly China.

The government has created a $40-billion Silk Road Fund for the infrastructure projects. Money will also come from the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the New Development Bank, a Shanghai institution for BRICS, an association of emerging markets led by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa.

China could funnel investments worth up to $502 billion over the next five years, according to a recent Credit Suisse report. Most funds, it said, will flow into countries such as Russia, Egypt, the Philippines, and Iran.

Much of Chinese financing, officials insist, will come in the way of loans. But lending money to less stable regions also creates new hazards.

“If it was easy to say, ‘We’re going to dump a bunch of money in Kazakhstan,’ it probably would have already been done by entities that have experience in this,” said Andrew Polk, director of China research at Medley Global Advisors in Beijing.

“There’s a risk China overextends itself abroad and some of this backfires.”

 

Russia’s Agony: An Eyewitness Account of the Russian Revolution

eBOOK: Russia’s Agony – An Eyewitness Account of the Russian Revolution

Russia’s Agony: An Eyewitness Account of the Russian Revolution

“Russia’s Agony: An Eyewitness Account of the Russian Revolution” by Robert Wilton (1919)

The London Times’ correspondent in Russia provided the first Western eyewitness account of the monumental events that resulted in the creation of the Soviet Union. Wilton provides a full historical background and the disastrous course of WWI for Russia, which set the scene for the seizure of power by the Bolsheviks.

He then details the Red Terror’s full enormity, and ends with the optimistic—and incorrect—hope that Bolshevism and Communism would be short-lived. Although Wilton’s credentials were impeccable and his status unchallenged, this book was blacklisted because he dared to report openly on the overwhelming number of Jews amongst the Communist revolutionaries.

He wrote:

“Bolshevism is not Russian—it is essentially non-national; its leaders belong almost entirely to the race that lost its country and its nationhood long ago. In April 1918, the Bolshevist “Government,” including 384 “Peoples’ Commissaries,” was represented by 2 negroes, 13 Russians, 15 Chinamen, 22 Armenians and Georgians, and more than 300 Jews. Of the last, 264 had come to Russia from the United States during the ‘Revolution.’

“I reported from Riga on the pernicious influence of Jewish Extremists. But this appeal to moderation was willfully distorted by the Jewish Press. Facts cited by me on the best authority were “proved” to be non-existent, and a campaign of slander and intimidation followed. Now, I was threatened with nothing less than murder.”

“Afterwards their numbers increased largely, and although they studiously concealed their identity under assumed Russian or Polish names, it became known that the principal ones were: Nahamkez-Steklov, Apfelbaum-Zinoviev, Rosenfeldt-Kamenev, Goldmann-Gorev, Goldberg-Mekowski, Zederbaum-Martov, Himmer-Sukhanov, Krachman-Zagorski, Hollander-Mieshkowski, Lourier-Larin, Seffer-Bogdanov. Among the leaders of this gang—under Lenin—were: Trotsky, whose real name was Bronstein, and Feldmann, alias Chernov.”

“Moreover, the Press, almost entirely in Jewish hands, had gone over to the Soviet, and Moderate organs that would not publish the Soviet proclamations glorifying spoilation and promoting Anarchy had been summarily ‘expropriated’ on behalf of newly founded Socialist publications.”

“The revolutionary pseudo-Jews were thus destroying Russia’s hopes of a national revival and dragging the country into disaster.”

This is the first modern edition to be completely reset and which contains all the hand-restored original pictures and maps.

About the author: Robert Archibald Wilton (1868–1925) was a British journalist who worked for the New York Herald in Europe, corresponding on both Russian and German affairs. A fluent Russian-speaker—his father had worked in that country—Wilton served as part of a British contingent with the Russian army during the First World War, and was awarded the Cross of St George. At the same time, he took up an appointment as the Times of London’s correspondent in St Petersburg. As such, he became the Anglo-Saxon speaking world’s best-known correspondent from Russia during the last years of the Tsarist regime and the Bolshevist Revolution. After the Revolution Wilton escaped from Russia and took up his former employment with the New York Herald. He died from cancer at the Hertford British Hospital in Paris, after authoring two books detailing his experiences in Russia: Russia’s Agony (1918) and The Last Days of the Romanovs (1920).

Contents

Chapter I: Introduction

Chapter II: Origins, Rise, and Decline

Chapter III: Bureaucracy and Okhrana

Chapter IV: The National Conscience

Chapter V: Razputinism and the Court

Chapter VI: German Influences

Chapter VII: The Jews

Chapter VIII: Conditions of Upheaval

Chapter IX: Revolution versus Evolution

Chapter X: Revolutionary Parties

Chapter XI: The Revolution

Chapter XII: The Soviet, “Coalition,” and Bolshevism

Chapter XIII: Abdication and After

Chapter XIV: Mutiny of the Sailors

Chapter XV: “No Annexation and No Indemnity”

Chapter XVI: Anarchy

Chapter XVII: The Outbreak of Hostilities

Chapter XVIII: Poor Armaments; Splendid Army

Chapter XIX: Soldau-Tannenberg and After

Chapter XX: “The Hun within the Gates”

Chapter XXI: Nationality Problems

Chapter XXII: Short-Lived Victory

Chapter XXIII: The Bolshevist Betrayal

Chapter XXIV: The Fight with Bolshevism

Chapter XXV: The Hope of Russia

Chapter XXVI: The New Russia

Appendix I: Declaration of the Progressive Bloc

Appendix II: The “Soldiers’ Charter”

Appendix III: Foreign Trade of Russia

[embeddoc url=”http://zionistreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Russias-Agony.pdf” download=”all” viewer=”google”]

Silk Road

VIDEO: The Silk Road Economic Belt And The New Tech To Track Every Homeless Person In NYC

The Silk Road Economic Belt and the New Maritime Silk Road, one belt one road policy also called OBOR is said to be ‘infrastructure for trading’ but is that its only purpose? The EU was also said to be created to help ‘European trade’ and look at it now! This ‘infrastructure’ will help China expand its ideology, political system and influence to western Europe. There is no doubt that they are preparing the merging of Europe with Asia. As you can clearly see, they are getting us ready to be enslaved while we are busy thinking about stupid internal politics that are nothing more than a distraction. 

 

Putin Calls For International Unity On Overcast Victory Day

‘International Unity”? or you mean International Dictatorship Vladimir? Putin’s hypocrisy and cynism are not human and the disgusting international media supported by the tribe helps him display his power to the world, while it continues brainwashing the sheeple. The level of lies and deceit is unreal. Victory Day? How can the defeat of Hitler be called ‘Victory Day’? That was the day when the world fell forever into the hands of communism and after WWIII, we will live through it and see it rule with absolute power and no opposition again. While the criminals celebrate the atrocities THEY carried out, ignorance is killing humanity.

“Putin calls for international unity on overcast Victory Day,” Source:  nydailynews.com

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday told the annual Victory Day parade on Red Square that the horrors of World War II demonstrate the necessity of countries working together to prevent war.
Russia celebrates the 1945 defeat of Nazi Germany every May 9 to honor the 8 million Red Army soldiers who fought and died for their country.

“This monstrous tragedy was not able to be prevented primarily because of the connivance of the criminal ideology of racial superiority and due to the lack of unity among the world’s leading nations,” Putin said.

“To effectively combat terrorism, extremism, neo-Nazism and other threats, consolidation of the entire international community is necessary,” he said.

The Soviet Union is estimated to have lost 26 million people in the war, including the 8 million soldiers. The nation’s immense suffering contributes to Victory Day’s status as Russia’s most important secular holiday.

Thick clouds over Moscow on Tuesday forced the cancellation of the traditional dramatic conclusion to the parade — the roaring flyover by scores of military aircraft.

The Red Square parade is a highly ritualized display, and marked changes in its order are unusual.

The Defense Ministry had said cloud-seeding planes would be deployed to disperse the overcast skies. That has been done previously when poor weather threatened. It wasn’t immediately clear if the planes had been deployed.

Parades also were held across Russia’s sprawling expanse as well as in the Russia-annexed Crimea Peninsula, but the Red Square procession is the centerpiece of Russia’s observances.

About 10,000 soldiers participated, standing rigidly as Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu reviewed them while standing in an open-top limousine. The soldiers then marched out to make way for a display of military vehicles ranging from armored cars to lumbering Topol ICBM launchers.

The parade gave the first public showing of Tor and Pantsir mobile surface-to-air missile that have been adapted for use in Russia’s Arctic forces, their white-and-black winter camouflage standing out amid the olive drab of other war machines.

“The armed forces of Russia are capable of repelling any potential aggression,” Putin said.

In the afternoon, hundreds of thousands of people braved temperatures near freezing to march in the “Immortal Regiment” demonstration that honors those who fought in the war.

The throng, many of them bearing photos of relatives who endured the war, covered a six-kilometer (3 ¾ -mile) route down Tverskaya Street, Moscow’s most iconic avenue, and through Red Square.

Police said the crowd numbered about 600,000, a show of determination to keep the war’s renown alive as living memory of it dwindles.

Self-propelled artillery vehicles Msta S are transported by trucks after the Victory Day military parade in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Self-propelled artillery vehicles Msta S are transported by trucks after the Victory Day military parade in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

A participant of parade yawns prior the Victory Day military parade at Dvortsovaya (Palace) Square in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

A participant of parade yawns prior the Victory Day military parade at Dvortsovaya (Palace) Square in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Mikoyan MIG-31, supersonic all-weather long-range jets fly over a statue of an angel fixed atop the Alexander Column during the Victory Day military parade in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Mikoyan MIG-31, supersonic all-weather long-range jets fly over a statue of an angel fixed atop the Alexander Column during the Victory Day military parade in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

WWII veteran Alexei Marchenkov, 94, poses for a photo at the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Marchenkov went to a front on July 12, 1941 in the Soviet Union and finished his service on Sept. 2, 1945 at Far East. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

WWII veteran Alexei Marchenkov, 94, poses for a photo at the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Marchenkov went to a front on July 12, 1941 in the Soviet Union and finished his service on Sept. 2, 1945 at Far East. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Moldovan President Igor Dodon, right, put flowers at a WWII memorial near the Kremlin wall after the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Moldovan President Igor Dodon, right, put flowers at a WWII memorial near the Kremlin wall after the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Russian army soldiers march along the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Russian army soldiers march along the Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu salutes to his soldiers as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu salutes to his soldiers as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian marines march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian marines march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive Arctic military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive Arctic military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive Arctic military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive Arctic military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive famous WWII tank T-34 along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers drive famous WWII tank T-34 along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers drive military vehicles along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu crosses himself as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu crosses himself as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu salutes to his soldiers as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu salutes to his soldiers as he is driven along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade to celebrate 72 years since the end of WWII and the defeat of Nazi Germany, in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

Russian soldiers march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

A tank driver looks on prior the Victory Day military parade at Dvortsovaya (Palace) Square in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

A tank driver looks on prior the Victory Day military parade at Dvortsovaya (Palace) Square in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Russian soldiers march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia's most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army's determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Russian soldiers march along Red Square during the Victory Day military parade in Moscow, on Tuesday, May 9, 2017. Victory Day is Russia’s most important secular holiday, commemorating the Red Army’s determination and losses in World War II. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)